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Our lost comrades by thefirstfleet Our lost comrades by thefirstfleet
After finding a lost Soviet space capsule in the asteroid field between Mars and Jupiter while en route to Earth, the Polaris crew must fight History itself about who was really the first man out there.

"Mr. Premier, do you understand who this man was? Who he is? Back then, they had no Warp drives. They had no artificial gravity, not even on-board computers! They strapped you on top of a metal tube filled with explosive chemicals and literally blasted you out into space. Those men were the heroes, not us! And I don't care if this man was the first, the tenth or the hundred-twenty-sixth in space, I will not allow you to deny his place in history!"

Captain David Metlesits, to the Premier of the USSR



Actually, this is a redux of an earlier picture of mine: Ever homeward by thefirstfleet




Models by me
Asteroids by :iconhameed:










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:iconcuddlesaurus21:
cuddlesaurus21 Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
This sounds like a really thought-provoking and poignant story!

And yes, just thinking about the spaceflight conditions we still have today almost makes my skin crawl... I could never be brave enough to face the vast emptiness of space with so little standing between me and the void... astronauts/cosmonauts/etc. definitely have my respect!
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2018
Agreed!

There is an old joke that goes the following:

A Russian is asked: For how much would he volunteer as an astronaut:
The Russian says: for 30 million Dollars. I'd give 10 to my family, 10 to charity, and keep 10 for myself.
They ask the same question to an American. He answers: For 60 million dollars. I'd give 20 to my family, 20 to charity and keep 20 for myself.
They ask the question to a Hungarian, to which he anwers: For 90 million Dollars. I'd have the party of a lifetime from 60 million and give 30 million to the Russian to fly instead of me!
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:iconcuddlesaurus21:
cuddlesaurus21 Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Hahaha, that was an awesome joke! :XD: Thanks so much for sharing that! (And I agree with the Hungarian, even though I'm an American... I'm not much of a "party" person, but the "pay somebody else" bit, yes, definitely! :giggle:)
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:iconcolourbrand:
Colourbrand Featured By Owner Edited Feb 9, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
"And I don't care if this man was the first, the tenth or the hundred-twenty-sixth in space, I will not allow you to deny his place in history!"

:clap:

This is a beautiful thing written - you sir are more than an artist - you are now a scholar!

:salute:
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2018
Thank you very much, kind Sir!
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:iconpaws4thot:
paws4thot Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2018
It's very "forced perspective", but it does put ST vs 20th century craft into some sort of perspective.
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2018
Thank you, this was my goal with this pic.
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:iconjeszasz:
JESzasz Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
 Watching a program on the Challenger Disaster and part of Apollo 13 last night brought this to mind.

 Our spaceflight technology is primitive.

 We have no shields, not even navigational deflectors to protect us from radiation.

 Our fuel is usually limited due to being chemical based, while using nuclear power, while leaving for more of a margin of error, makes up for that with it's radioactive material.

 Artificial gravity is dependent on mechanical means.

 Oh, and the vehicles can be as flimsy as paper. A bump in the wrong area, not enough fuel, or ice build up in the wrong place, and you die. If you have an idiot in charge who says to go ahead with the launch, even though an expert says that it isn't safe to do so, you're one of the the lucky ones if you crash into the Atlantic, and probably die from getting hit with 125 gs on impact. There isn't really any margin of error when it comes to these vehicles.

 That is not to say that I agree with you on who are heroes. Those who serve in any of the Fleets would be considered heroes in their time, but those who strap themselves to these firecrackers are the ones with real balls, because as usual with flying: it's not the take off that's hard. It's the landing. And did I mention radiation from the sun?

 If the Premier of the Russian Republic attempts to cover-up this discovery as "top secret", I honestly expect you to just leak it to the press.

 I wouldn't dare call it the USSR, and neither would the people of the future. It's highly unlikely that all of the countries that once made up the USSR would unite into a single region like the EU or US. Even now, an authoritarian has taken all but complete control of Russia, where money controls policy, and where most dissent is quashed, so Russians have a LOT of catch-up to do when it comes to building a good reputation. After all of the human rights abuses (and indeed state-sanctioned murders) typical of a banana republic, even if the memories faded, I wouldn't expect the feelings to do so as quickly.
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2018
Well, in the Polaris universe, the USSR survived, Gorby managed to pull it off. So things are a bit different. Also, as it is usually said about 20th century stuff throughout Trek, due to data loss in WWIII, things are a bit sketchy.
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:iconbillynikoll:
BillyNikoll Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice concept! :clap:
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2018
Thank you very much!
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:iconbillynikoll:
BillyNikoll Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
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:iconhewhogroks:
hewhogroks Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Interesting concept!

Unfortunately, the Soviets never developed rockets able to put a capsule so far from Earth.  But then, maybe they did in this alternate timeline ;)
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018
Also, it had 200 years to drift.
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:iconhewhogroks:
hewhogroks Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Mm that's not how orbits work but sure ;)
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:icondanubium:
Danubium Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018
Ivan Ivanovich never got the recognition he deserved.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Iva…
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018
Ivan lives on in our hearts!
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:icontraeumer1981:
Traeumer1981 Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018
Looks great once again!
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018
Thank you very much!
Reply
:iconspacecowboy5000:
SpaceCowboy5000 Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Incredible work.  I love realism.
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Thank you very much!

I wanted this to be as realiatic as possible.
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:iconcrumb662:
CRUMB662 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 2, 2018
Excellent job.  I watched a show about the Soviet space program that featured two brothers, from Italy, who claim that they picked up transmissions from a Russian capsule that was sending a mayday as it tumbled into deep space.  This maybe be him. :D

www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9plIR…
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Yupp, I know about the brothers. When I first read their stories about a decade ago, I became an instant fan of the Lost Cosmonaut scene.

BTW, all those weird deaths of NASA weems all cover-upp-y to me too. Test pilot level air jockeys dying from a Cessna crash... no!
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:iconcrumb662:
CRUMB662 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2018
I guess there are things we will never know.  But I find the story fascinating.
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:iconcrumb662:
CRUMB662 Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Thumbsup Emoticon II 
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:icontrekkiegal:
TrekkieGal Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
Must see that episode.
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Give me a million bucks and I'll make it :D
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:icontrekkiegal:
TrekkieGal Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
Do you take an IOU?
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:iconballoonprincess:
BalloonPrincess Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018  Hobbyist Filmographer
Very cool work.  :heart:
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Thank you very much!
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:iconballoonprincess:
BalloonPrincess Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2018  Hobbyist Filmographer
**Giggles!**

My pleasure.  :heart:
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:iconcaptainzammo:
CaptainZammo Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Love the lost Cosmonaut theories---and this is awesome David
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Thank you very much!
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:iconphenometron:
Phenometron Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
This is sincerely enjoyable. ^-^
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
In a dark way, yes.
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:iconliquidcross:
liquidcross Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018  Hobbyist Interface Designer
Wait a minute...there's no USSR in the 23rd century! :D

Or would it be the Eastern Coalition, still?
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:iconcelticarchie:
celticarchie Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
You should check this movie out, www.amazon.co.uk/Spacewalker-D… it's in Russian subtitled in English, but wow :wow: what an eye-opening look into their space program stories. :D
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:iconthefirstfleet:
thefirstfleet Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Yupp, this was what actually inspired this pic :D
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:iconcelticarchie:
celticarchie Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2018
Clap 
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